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ABOUT THE SLICE OF BRAIN I VIDEODISC

[sorry...the inventory is depleted and the disc is no longer available]

 

 

As a spin-off disc from the SLICE OF LIFE project, SLICE OF BRAIN I is a two-sided videodisc encyclopedia of 20,799 stills and 151 motion sequences assembled as a resource for neuroscience education. The creation of this disc is the result of a collaboration between departments and faculty at the University of Utah and the University of Washington. It is intended for the professional, biomedical, undergraduate and graduate neuroscience communities.

Bullet 21,000 IMAGES and 151 MOTION SEQUENCES
Bullet IMAGE TYPES

Bullet MULTI-PURPOSE DESIGN
Bullet 12-INCH LASER VIDEODISC
Bullet EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS
Bullet SOB ON CD/DVD?

Bullet WHAT'S ON SOB I?
Bullet IMAGE INDEX TO SOB I
Bullet CONTENT SAMPLER FOR SOB I
Bullet CONTENT CONTRIBUTORS

Bullet RELATED PRODUCT: Slice of Life VII

 

 

 

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21,000 IMAGES and 151 MOTION SEQUENCES IN A VISUAL ENCYCLOPEDIA:

SLICE OF BRAIN I is a visual encyclopedia, containing more than 20,799 still images and 151 motion sequences related to neuroscience education.

The disc draws on a wealth of images contributed by 35 institutions and one professional society. There are a total of 119 individual contributors for SLICE OF BRAIN I. You may wish to review our complete list of Contributors.

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IMAGE TYPES :

The videodisc frames contain a variety of image types, including: Motion Video Segments, Histology, Gross Specimens, Microscopic, Models, People and Patients, Text, X-Rays, Angiograms, CTs, and MRIs, to name a few. Below are listed some of the specific descriptions used to index and identify each image on the disc:

 IMAGE TYPE

  • animation
  • autofluorescence
  • cytology
  • cytology, labeled
  • diagram
  • diagram, labeled
  • electrocardiogram
  • transmission electron micrograph
  • endoscopy
  • flow cytometry
  • fluorescence
  • gross image
  • gross image, labeled
  • gross, microscopic
  • gross, x-ray
  • immunofluorescence
  • karyotype
  • microscopic
  • microscopic, labeled
  • microscopic, x-ray
  • other or model
  • other or model, labeled
  • person or patient
  • person or patient, labeled
  • scanning electron micrograph
  • text
  • x-ray
  • x-ray, labeled

 X-RAY TYPE

  • air contrast
  • angiogram
  • barium
  • cholangiogram
  • CT: computed tomography
  • magnetic resonance angiogram
  • mammogram
  • MRI: magnetic resonance imaging
  • myelogram
  • other x-ray type
  • plain film
  • radionuclide scan
  • tomogram
  • ultrasound

 MRI TYPE

  • T1 weighted MRI
  • T2 weighted MRI
  • T1 & T2 weighted MRI
  • dynamic scanning MRI
  • gradient echo MRI
  • proton density MRI

 RADIOLOGY CONTRAST

  • bone window
  • body coil
  • head coil
  • unspecified contrast
  • with radiology contrast
  • without radiology contrast

 IMAGE ORIENTATION

  • anterior view
  • anterioposterior view
  • axial plane
  • coronal plane
  • external surface
  • horizontal plane
  • inferior view
  • internal surface
  • lateral view
  • longitudinal orientation
  • medial view
  • oblique view
  • posterior view
  • posterioanterior view
  • superior view
  • sagittal plane
  • transverse plane
  • median plane
  • GI orientation: ascending colon
  • GI orientation: anus
  • GI orientation: stomach antrum
  • GI orientation: bulb of duodenum
  • GI orientation: cardia of stomach
  • GI orientation: descending colon
  • GI orientation: duodenum
  • GI orientation: lower esophagus
  • GI orientation: middle esophagus
  • GI orientation: rectum
  • GI orientation: sigmoid colon
  • GI orientation: transverse colon
  • GI orientation: upper esophagus

 ORGAN TYPE

  • abdomen
  • adrenal
  • ankle
  • anus
  • aorta
  • appendix
  • arm
  • artery
    -
  • back
  • biochemistry
  • bladder
  • blood
  • body
  • bone
  • bone marrow
  • brain
  • breast
  • bronchus
  • buttock
    -
  • cell
  • cerebellum
  • cervix
  • chemistry
  • chest
  • colon
  • connective
  • cranial nerve
  • CSF
    -
  • duodenum
    -
  • ear
  • ECG
  • elbow
  • embryo
  • epididymis
  • epiglottus
  • esophagus
  • eye
    -
  • face
  • fat
  • feces
  • fetus
  • figure
  • foot
  • forearm
    -
  • gallbladder
  • ganglion
    -
  • hand
  • head
  • heart
  • hip
  • hypothalamus
    -
  • joint
    -
  • kidney
  • knee
    -
  • lab
  • larynx
  • leg
  • liver
  • lung
  • lymph node
  • lymphatics
  • mediastinum
  • medulla
  • meninges
  • micro
  • midbrain
  • mouth
  • muscle
    -
  • neck
  • nerve
  • nose
    -
  • ovary
  • oviduct
    -
  • pancreas
  • parathyroid
  • pelvis
  • penis
  • pericardium
  • pharynx
  • pineal
  • pituitary
  • placenta
  • pleura
  • pleural fluid
  • pons
  • prostate
    -
  • rectum
    -
  • salivary gland
  • shoulder
  • sinus
  • skin
  • skull
  • small bowel
  • soft tissue
  • spinal cord
  • spine
  • spleen
  • sputum
  • stomach
    -
  • teeth
  • testes
  • thalamus
  • thigh
  • thorax
  • thymus
  • thyroid
  • tongue
  • tonsil
  • trachea
  • trauma
    -
  • ureter
  • urethra
  • urine
  • uterus
    -
  • vagina
  • vein
  • vessel
  • vulva
    -
  • wrist

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MULTI-PURPOSE DESIGN:

SLICE OF BRAIN I is a generic (multipurpose) videodisc that can be integrated into a host of instructional designs, computer software tutorials, self-tests, learning environments, hardware configurations, and problem-based curricula. It supplies the video images and is intentionally created to be "re-purposed" by other schools and institutions in order to match their local needs and teaching goals. Whether driven by a hand controller, a barcode reader, or a computer, this videodisc is a powerful vehicle for independent and cross-discipline learning.

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12-INCH LASER VIDEODISC:

Do not confuse the SLICE OF BRAIN I laser videodisc with CD-ROM or DVD-Video and DVD-ROM technologies. SOB I is a traditional 12-inch videodisc whose images can be seen by connecting the output of the laserdisc player to a television monitor. It offers instant random access to any of its 54,000 frames. These frames are not stored as individual picture files as you would find with a CD-ROM or DVD-ROM. The advantages of the laserdisc medium are its stability, quality, fast image retrieval, and density of information on a single disc.

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EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS:

The video and audio outputs of the videodisc player are normally connected to a regular NTSC video or television monitor for viewing. If computer training or tutorials are involved, this means you will have a "two screen" setup with the computer-based materials displayed on a computer monitor and the videodisc images seen on a TV set.

Industrial grade videodisc players have an RS-232 port which allows their playback to be controlled through software when connected by a serial cable to a computer. (Unfortunately, it is very difficult to find these special serial cables from commercial suppliers any more.) Many users channel the output of the videodisc signal through an analog to-digital image capture card, thus allowing the disc images to be viewed through the computer monitor (ofetn referred to as a "single-screen solution").

Unfortunately, laser videodisc players are hard to find these days. Some fans of Slice of Life report that eBay has been a good source for used or like-new videodisc players. Pioneer still sells industrial grade players, usually through Prosumer AV dealers. Consult the Pioneer Electronics website for more information about videodisc players. In Salt Lake City, a vendor still offering videodisc players is:

Inkley's Audio Visual
2150 South State
Salt Lake City, Utah 84115 USA
801-486-5985

If you need to find a remote hand-controller, we've found various models on this web-based retailer: http://www.replacementremotes.com/

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SOB ON CD/DVD?

Sorry, not available. Please refer to our section of information on Slice of Life and Slice of Brain in digital format for further explanations.

SOL on CD/DVD?

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WHAT'S ON SOB I?

Overview

Much of the disc's contents has been collected from five previously published videodiscs:

  1. SLICE OF LIFE VI (University of Utah),
  2. THE DIGITAL ANATOMIST: HUMAN BRAIN ANIMATIONS (University of Washington),
  3. SEIZURES, MOVEMENT DISORDERS AND NEUROLOGIC SIGNS (The University of Ottawa),
  4. DISORDERS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM: MOTOR (University of Washington), and
  5. HEAD TO TOE: A Health Assessment Videodisc (University of Utah).

Additionally, the SLICE OF BRAIN I contains 8,832 previously unpublished images in neuropathology and neuroradiology, 700 gross anatomy dissections (monoscopic and stereoscopic versions) from the DAVID L. BASSETT ATLAS OF HUMAN ANATOMY (Central Nervous System, Head and Neck, and The Back), 68 gross and electron microscopic views of cochlear anatomy, and 165 serial sections of a rhesus monkey brain. Approximately 7 minutes of reconstructed digital brain animations demonstrate the interrelationships of major brain structures as they rotate. The numerous "patient sequences" demonstrate dynamic pathologic terms such as ataxia, hyperreflexia, and hemiplegia. Physical examinations of central nervous system function and related motor responses (15 minutes) are included on Side 2 of the SLICE OF BRAIN I.

Contributions from the University of Washington

The Digital Anatomist Program in the Department of Biological Structure, University of Washington, Seattle, has developed a database of digital images. Several minutes of computer graphic reconstructions of the brain are taken from the videodisc DIGITAL ANATOMIST: HUMAN BRAIN ANIMATIONS produced by J.W. Sundsten, Ph.D. and K.G. Kastella, Ph.D. Several hundred still images have also been contributed by Dr. Sundsten. What appears as an animated tour through the human head when played back in real time are 344 MRI scans of a human volunteer sliced at 1.3 mm in three orthogonal planes. These are provided by J.S. Tsuruda, M.D. and K.R. Maravilla, M.D.

Many of the patient sequences are derived from the videodisc DISORDERS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM: MOTOR. It is a compilation of materials on neurological dysfunction developed by Pamela S. Mitchell, R.N., M.N, Ph.D.; Nancy Konikow, R.N., M.N.; and Nancy Woods, R.N. Ph.D. (University of Washington School of Nursing, Department of Physiological Nursing) and John Bolles, M.S. (Health Sciences Center for Educational Resources).

Also included on the SLICE OF BRAIN I are 5,250 gross and microscopic neuropathology images from the University of Washington Department of Neuropathology. These photographs were selected from over 20,000 cases that have been collected during the last 35 years under the supervision of Ellsworth C. Alvord, Jr., M.D., with the assistance of Cheng-Mei Shaw, M.D., and S. Mark Sumi, M.D.

Contributions from the University of Utah

Over 10,000 neuroscience related images previously published on the SLICE OF LIFE VI videodisc were transferred to the SLICE OF BRAIN I. From 92 individual contributors, these videodisc frames represent the best of the neuroscience related materials from the SLICE OF LIFE, including 1,972 images from the collection of Suzanne S. Stensaas, Ph.D., University of Utah. Anne G. Osborn, M.D., of the Department of Radiology, has placed 1,993 supplemental neuroradiology images on the SLICE OF BRAIN I, complementing the 1,580 frames transferred from the SLICE OF LIFE VI.

The College of Nursing contributed 57 segments from its HEAD TO TOE: A HEALTH ASSESSMENT VIDEODISC. Found on Side 2 of the SLICE OF BRAIN I, these motion sequences and stills relate to the normal motor and sensory neurological examination. The original two-sided disc was produced by Thom J. Mansen, R.N., Ph.D. and Sandra W. Haak, R.N., Ph.D., in cooperation with Media Solutions, University of Utah.

Other Major Contributors

The SLICE OF BRAIN producers are delighted to be able to include on this videodisc 700 images from the collection of the DAVID L. BASSETT ATLAS OF HUMAN ANATOMY. The full collection can be found on the SLICE OF LIFE VI and VII videodiscs, but the anatomy related to the Central Nervous System, The Head and Neck, and the Back have been included here. Licensed from Mrs. Lucile Bassett, Mrs. William Gruber, and Robert A. Chase, M.D., Stanford University, the SLICE OF BRAIN has both the monoscopic (2-D) and the stereoscopic (3-D) versions of Dr. Bassett's dissections originally published as a printed index and atlas with Viewmaster reels. The monoscopic version (on Side 1) and the stereoscopic companions (on Side 2) have identical frame locations. The same videodisc frame number will access different versions of the same picture. In order to view the stereoscopic, interlaced, NTSC video signal from the laser videodisc, a pair of LCD, 3-D Shutter glasses is required. A supplier of these glasses is the 3-D TV Corporation at the following website: http://www.3dmagic.com.

From the University of Ottawa, Canada, 34 sequences were transferred from the videodisc SEIZURES, MOVEMENT DISORDERS AND NEUROLOGIC SIGNS by John Bormanis, M.D., Chris Skinner, M.D., and R.F. Nelson, M.D. Extensive descriptions have been included to identify the patient, the case, and the results of treatments.

It is with pride that the neuropathology slide collection (1,075) of Emanuel R. Ross, M.D., has been included in the SLICE OF BRAIN I videodisc. His passing in 1993 added determination to our efforts and that of his colleagues at the Loyola University, Stritch School of Medicine, Chicago, to complete the image transfers and indexing for the SLICE OF BRAIN I.

Please refer to the two sections below for additional information about what is on the Slice of Brain I videodisc.

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IMAGE INDEX TO SOB I:

How do you search and sort through the thousands of frames on the videodisc to find images that interest you? Refer to the web page on our customized INDEX TO THE SLICE OF BRAIN I VIDEODISC created in FileMaker Pro and available on a separate CD-ROM for both Macintosh and Windows 3.1/95/98/NT/2000/XT platforms. ASCII text versions are also provided so you can import the descriptions into your favorite database or spread sheet program.

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CONTENT SAMPLER FOR SOB I:

The sample of subjects and image locations provided here only scratches the surface of the breadth and depth of the SLICE OF BRAIN videodisc. This sampler is not intended as a complete index (see INDEX TO THE SLICE OF BRAIN I VIDEODISC). It is an overview and can be used if you already have access to one of our videodiscs.

This sampler is organized in by individual contributor:

 SOB I SAMPLER: Sorted by Individual Contributor

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RELATED PRODUCT: Slice of Brain I

The SLICE OF LIFE VII Videodisc is a visual encyclopedia, containing more than 44,000 still images and 65 motion sequences related to human medicine, nursing, dentistry and allied health education. The seventh edition represents contributions from 63 institutions, two professional societies, a pharmaceutical company, and 240 individuals throughout the United States, Canada, Latin America, Europe and Australia.

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